What's Hot
MOST READ
What's Going On

Calendar

Search thousands of events in our database.

Restaurants

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Nightlife

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Orlando Daily Deals powered by ReferLocal

OW on Twitter
OW on Facebook
Print Email

COLUMN

Savage Love

My life is not horrible

Photo: , License: N/A


We don't have to mope. We don't have to pretend that we feel oppressed 24/7. And we don't have to attend pointless queer events that are run by LGBT whiners who mistake wallowing in self-pity for activism. You'll find, once you get out of college, that most of us aren't moping, pretending or attending. Most of us are getting on with our lives and 
doing fine.

But, again, not all LGBT people are doing fine, MG, just as not all LGBT people are white or upper-class or in college or lucky enough to live in Bellingham. If you're in a position to do something, you should. You don't have to do everything. Make your contribution. It doesn't have to take over your life, and you don't have to pretend to be any more oppressed than you actually are. But you should 
do something.

Remember: The only thing more annoying than a whiny, college-age queer with a persecution complex is a smug, college-age queer who takes his good fortune for granted and couldn't give a shit about other people because, hey, he's got his (his weed, his boys, his education).

I'm a 26-year-old lady who just broke up with a man I thought I wanted to marry. We had incredible, playful sex, were very kind to each other, are both a little queer, and share many interests in spite of our 20-year age difference.

Six months into our relationship, I moved to a bigger city four hours away, and we could see each other only every other weekend. Because of our careers, it wouldn't be possible for us to live in the same place again for at least two or three years, maybe more. That was one reason I broke up with him. I also feared that he needed to be with a man - even though he loves me to sit on his face. He's definitely bi, but he's never been with a man. I am, too, but having had girlfriends makes me comfortable knowing that I mostly want to be with men. Part of me is excited to be free to explore my new city on my own and trusts I made a mature decision. Part of me thinks I really fucked up to let go of a kind, fun - if slightly flawed (but they all are) - relationship. What do you think?

Drowning My Sorrows In Glee

I think it's a wonderful thing to be 26, bi, single, employed and living in a big city. I think that a guy who's single, bi and amazing in bed at 46 is likely to be single, bi and amazing in bed at 48. (No guarantees, of course.) You should enjoy the next couple of years and then revisit the issue of Mr. Wonderful if and when you two or circumstances conspire to put you in the same place again.

I have to take you to task for your answer to Sent From My iPhone. In your answer, you compared condoms and withdrawal as methods of birth control. As a former Planned Parenthood volunteer educator, I will tell you that, like withdrawal, condoms alone are NEVER a recommended form of birth control. To compare these two "methods" is a little irresponsible. In fact, condoms alone weren't even on our list of birth control methods. The good news is that condoms PLUS spermicide were on that list. When used together and properly, condoms and spermicide are almost as effective as the pill in 
preventing pregnancy.

Loud Mouth About Birth Control

We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus