What's Hot
MOST READ
What's Going On

Calendar

Search thousands of events in our database.

Restaurants

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Nightlife

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

loading...

OW on Twitter
OW on Facebook
Print Email

News

Twelve21 Group Show: Conrad Crespin, Austin Moule and Madeleine Peck Wagner

Group show of mixed-media work creates new meaning through juxtaposition

Photo: , License: N/A

Conrad Crespin, “Untitled”

Photo: , License: N/A

Austin Moule, “And Then There’s That”


TWELVE21 GROUP SHOW: CONRAD CRESPIN, AUSTIN MOULE AND MADELEINE PECK WAGNER

7-10 p.m. Friday, June 28 | Twelve21 Gallery, 1221 N. Orange Ave. | 407-982-4357 | twelve21gallery.com | free

“Collage,” author Donald Barthelme said in 1975, “is the central principle of all art in the 20th century.”

From Brion Gysin’s literary cut-ups to Joseph Cornell’s boxes, Tristan Tzara’s Dada poetry to Gregg “Girl Talk” Gillis’ pop-tune mashups, it’s undeniably true that the assemblage of found elements to make an artistic statement rose to prominence in the last century and has continued into this one – perhaps it’s an inevitable side effect of the total media saturation we now live in. (If you’re interested in reading more about literary/musical/visual collage, I highly recommend Jonathan Lethem’s staggering essay “The Ecstasy of Influence: A Plagiarism.”) Twelve21’s latest show explores those magpie visual tendencies while also proving that when it’s done correctly – as art, not theft – collage is always more than just the sum of its component parts.

Conrad Crespin and Austin Moule work in classic mixed-media collage style – found objects, images and text fragments juxtaposed to pull a strong new signal from random visual noise. And when we say Moule’s work is extremely reminiscent of Robert Rauschenberg’s, it’s not meant as a jab, but simply part of that whole “ecstasy of influence” thing.

Madeleine Peck Wagner combines spray paint, acrylics, graphite and tape on birchwood boxes – an abstract series of monuments to bridges and overpasses, which Wagner sees as “a metaphor for transition and change.”

We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus